Last edited by Julabar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Warfare and politics in Anglo-Saxon England, 980-1016. found in the catalog.

Warfare and politics in Anglo-Saxon England, 980-1016.

L. H. Chappell

Warfare and politics in Anglo-Saxon England, 980-1016.

by L. H. Chappell

  • 31 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Dissertation (B.A. History) - King Alfred"s College, 1980.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21685685M

United Kingdom - United Kingdom - Anglo-Saxon England: Although Germanic foederati, allies of Roman and post-Roman authorities, had settled in England in the 4th century ce, tribal migrations into Britain began about the middle of the 5th century.   Martin Wall is the author of The Anglo-Saxon Age: The Birth of England (Amberley Publishing, ). In his new book, Martin challenges our notions of the Anglo-Saxon period as barbaric and backward, to reveal a civilisation he argues is as complex, sophisticated and diverse as our own.

The term “Anglo-Saxon” is the catch-all phrase for the groups of people who, starting in the 5th century CE, migrated from the European continent to what is today England, namely the Angles. INTERNED AS ENEMY, STILL HAILS BRITAIN; Portheim, Held as Alien During War, Writes Book Extolling Anglo-Saxon Culture. WOULD UNITE WHOLE RACE England.

Anglo-Saxons is the name collectively applied to the descendants of the Germanic people who settled in Britain between the late 4th and early 7th cents. and to their ancestors. Their backgrounds varied. Some came as mercenaries, others as invaders. They included, besides Angles and Saxons, Jutes and other had experience of Frankish Gaul and hence some acquaintance with Roman. Learning and Literature in Anglo-Saxon England. Cambridge University Press. pp. – ISBN Keynes, Simon (). "Royal government and the written word in late Anglo-Saxon England". In McKitterick, Rosamund. The Uses of Literacy in Early Medieval Europe. Cambridge University Press. ISBN Keynes, Simon ().


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Warfare and politics in Anglo-Saxon England, 980-1016 by L. H. Chappell Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a fairly comprehensive overview of both the gear and the nature of warfare in Anglo Saxon England, and has everything going for it: beautiful full colour plates of artefacts, reproductions, and reenactors, well researched and informative sections on all types of gear, specific details on certain artefacts, and much by:   Paul Hill, formerly curator of Kingston Upon Thames Museum in Surrey, is well known as a lecturer, author and expert on Anglo-Saxon and Norman history and military archaeology, and he has written several books on these subjects, among them The Age of Athelstan: Britain's Forgotten History, The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great and The Anglo-Saxons at War /5(10).

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book.

No eBook available Weapons and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England. Sonia C. Hawkes. Oxford University Committee for Archaeology, - History - s: 1. The influence of war on late Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman society was dominant and all-pervasive.

Here in this book, gathered together for the first time, are fundamental articles on warfare in England and Normandy in the 11th and 12th centuries, combining the work of some of the foremost scholars in the field.

Redressing the tendency to study military institutions and obligations in isolation. Buy Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England (Monograph (University of Oxford.

Committee for Archaeology), No. ) 1st by Hawkes, Sonia Chadwick (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(2). Landscape and warfare in Anglo-Saxon England and the Viking campaign of with the political geography of later Anglo-Saxon W essex.

36 Whilst. Landscape and warfare in Anglo-Saxon. Blog. 13 May Stay connected to your students with Prezi Video, now in Microsoft Teams; 12 May Remote work tips, tools, and advice: Interview with Mandy Fransz. Buy Anglo-Saxon Weapons and Warfare 2Rev Ed by Richard Underwood (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 5. As Underwood noted, "Warfare in the Anglo-Saxon period cannot be viewed as a uniform whole". This is because Anglo-Saxon society changed greatly during this period; in the fifth century, it constituted an array of small tribal groups while by the eleventh it had consolidated into a single state.

Anglo-Saxon charters are documents from the early medieval period in England, which typically made a grant of land, or recorded a earliest surviving charters were drawn up in the s: the oldest surviving charters granted land to the Church, but from the eighth century, surviving charters were increasingly used to grant land to lay people.

Weapons and Warfare in Anglo-Saxon England by Sonia Chadwick Hawkes,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Many different weapons were created and used in Anglo-Saxon England between the fifth and eleventh centuries.

Spears, used for piercing and throwing, were the most common commonplace weapons included the sword, axe, and knife—bows and arrows, as well as slings, were not frequently used by the defensive purposes, the shield was the most common item used by.

1 Introduction: A Society at War: Mentalities of Warfare in Later Anglo-Saxon England 1. Ealdorman &Aelig;helweard: The writing of history and the experience of warfare in the tenth century 2.

The Study of later Anglo-Saxon warfare: Themes and their studies 6. Ideologies of war 8. Masculinity, youth and experience in Anglo-Saxon warfare During his reign (), King Alfred revolutionized the governance of Wessex, greatly advancing the process that would culminate two generations later, in the creation of the kingdom of England.

His succes in fighting the Vikings not only saved Wessex from conquest but kept Britain from becoming one more outlier of Scandinavia. His administrative and military innovations provided his son.

Each group of Anglo-Saxon settlers had a leader or war-chief. A strong and successful leader became 'cyning', the Anglo-Saxon word for 'king'.

Each king ruled a kingdom and led a small army. Anglo-Saxon law, the body of legal principles that prevailed in England from the 6th century until the Norman Conquest ().

In conjunction with Scandinavian law and the so-called barbarian laws (leges barbarorum) of continental Europe, it made up the body of law called Germanic law.

Anglo-Saxon law was written in the vernacular and was relatively free of the Roman influence found in. T he country in which this book was conceived, and the literary language in which it is written, are both more than a thousand years old. The 'kingdom of England' was created by Anglo-Saxon politicians, soldiers and churchmen in the ninth and tenth centuries.

They and their subjects have left us a significant literature in their own language. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was compiled in the court of King Alfred the Great of Wessex late in the ninth century. The early entries in the Chronicle come from the oral traditions of the West Saxon (Wessex) kings, probably heroic poetry, which has been artificially fitted into an annalistic format.

Anglo-Saxon customs had eroded and the historicity is murky, but England suffered far less feudal paralysis than Continental Europe with a relatively fluid class system.

Bloodfeud: Murder and Revenge in Anglo-Saxon England Richard Fletcher Allen Lane £, pp King Canute, remembered today as a wise and good monarch, was a master of PR, projecting an image.

The book is an exploration of some of the characters who created Anglo-Saxon England - Boadicea, 'King Arthur', The Sutton Hoo Man, Offa, Alfred the Great, Athelstan, Eric Bloodaxe, Ethelred the Unready and William the Conqueror - some of the names that have echoed in my imagination since childhood, especially Eric Bloodaxe/5(80).Many scholars in Anglo-Saxon England would have consulted texts in both Latin and Old English.

Some Latin texts written in the Mediterranean may have contained unfamiliar or difficult words for Anglo-Saxon readers, even if they had a relatively accomplished grasp of Latin.

Students would have consulted a glossary to understand these complex words.The cardinal role of Anglo-Saxon libraries in the transmission of classical and patristic literature to the later middle ages has long been recognized, for these libraries sustained the researches of those English scholars whose writings determined the curriculum of medieval schools: Aldhelm, Bede, and Alcuin, to name only the best known.

Yet this is the first full-length account of the nature.